Alice Alexander's blog

Germantown Commons in Nashville Hosting the 2017 National Cohousing Conference

Germantown Commons of Nashville Tennessee is hosting the 2017 National Cohousing Conference in May. And your presence is especially requested!

The National Conference promises an exciting array of educational opportunities, networking and a fun time in Nashville. The Millennium Maxwell House Hotel will be the host location for the conference. It is minutes from the new Germantown Commons.

Rural Cohousing: Being a real neighbor in the old-time country sense

Several months ago there was a blog suggesting that “seniors” should look for cohousing communities in urban areas. While I understand the blogger’s reasons (having lived in cities, suburbs and rural areas), I’d like to offer an alternative for retirement or pre-retirement living.

National Cohousing Open House Day - Saturday, April 29, 2017

Plans are underway for our 2nd annual National Cohousing Open House Day, the last Saturday in April. Such synergy we created last year - as a national movement, within our network of area communities, and within our individual communities! We enjoyed participation from 95 communities across the country who opened their doors and welcomed the public. 2017 should be even bigger!

Reserve Study Webinar Jan 25, 2017

For those interested in the Reserve Study webinar hosted by National Condo
Advisors, please follow these instructions:

Please register for Reserve Study-Why Every Community NEEDS One!! on Jan
25, 2017 2:00 PM EST at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4766942937729361410

The Home Buying Decision + The Home Happiness Calculator

David Brooks writes in the NY Times (Jan 6) that buying a home is the most difficult decision in life. We don't choose a house so much as fall in love with it, he writes, and although we may envision a home with exotic things in which we will host large gatherings, most folks really seek privacy and tranquility. Lots of interesting angles here, true to David Brooks, but the real crux of this opinion piece - to me anyway - is his very last and almost lost comment at the end:

Social Permaculture: Applying the Principles

Social Permaculture, Public vs Private is the theme of the winter issue of Communities Magazine, exploring among other issues how "relationships with one another are just as sustainable, regenerative, and resilient as the ecological elements in a land-based permaculture system." Click here for this article profiling how permaculture's principles apply to human groups. And come discuss more about sustainable community at the 2017 National Cohousing Conference.

Permaculture’s 12 principles apply to human groups just as much as to any other ecological system. Here are some ways we can implement them in the social sphere:
1. Observe and interact. No matter how much you’re “starting” something, there’s an existing network of patterns. See what’s already happening. Participate in similar groups or processes, or ones from which you’ll be drawing participants. Write down observations day after day, and take the time to trace out patterns. You want to “nudge” the existing systems, not create new ones from whole cloth!

Power in Cooperative Groups, Part 1: Yourself

Join Laird at the 2017 National Cohousing Conference where he will present several sessions, including Power and Leadership.

I'm starting a blog series spotlighting the concept of power in cooperative culture. In the context of group dynamics—my main arena—power has to do with how people interrelate, but I want to start with the individual before interactions begin.

The Home Happiness Calculator. Why don’t we start measuring Happiness per Square Foot?

After World War Two, my grandmother and her husband fled Hungary as refugees to New York City with nothing but their suitcases. They got jobs at an assembly line in a paper cup factory and toiled for many years towards the American Dream. But their dream was cut short when my grandfather suddenly died of a heart attack in the New York public library. He left my grandmother alone to raise their young children while also working to get by.

Pushing Versus Inviting

There's a prevalent style of facilitation that's mostly passive—where the person running the meeting isn't doing much more than deciding who'll talk next, punctuated by the occasional need to blow the whistle, perhaps to signal that time has expired or to announce a restart, either to referee moments of fulminating tension or to cut through the fog of creeping chaos.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Alice Alexander's blog