Communities Magazine: a Pathway to Community

Yours with Words
Ever since working on my high school newspaper (1965-67), I’ve wanted to be a journalist. While that has by no means been the only thing I’ve wanted to be, communication has been one of my enduring passions.
Slowly, over the decades, I’ve succeeded.
Starting in the 80s I occasionally authored magazine articles about community living. Concurrent with that, I launched a career as a process consultant, which inexorably led to report writing—lots of report writing.
Lost in the Fun House
Then things took a jump in 1992 when I negotiated FIC becoming the publisher of Communities magazine, taking over from Charles Betterton, who had lost the resource base to keep things going. This opportunity opened three doors at once: writer, editor, publisher.
—Over the two-plus decades that FIC has been behind the wheel, I’ve typically authored 6-8 magazine articles annually. Given that the road to effective writing is pretty much the same one that Lily Tomlin points out as the way you get to Carnegie Hall—practice—this steady work has been enormously beneficial in the development of my craft.
—Having apprenticed at my father’s knee as a snob about words and their proper usage, I’ve also worked the other side of the aisle: editing. Even as far back as the early ’90s, a network compatriot wryly gifted me a red pen for my birthday, because, after receiving my mark-ups of his draft white paper, he knew I must go through them faster than a garlic eater consumes breath mints.
—Rarest of all is the chance to be a publisher. While the circulation of Communities has never been above 1600, in our own small way we are a market-maker when it comes to grammar, spelling, and the meaning of words. We get to be ruthless in stamping out the cutesy disease of interior capitalization (“CoHousing” and “EcoVillage” make me want to vomit), expurgating unneeded hyphens (“e-mail,” “by-laws,” and “non-profit” are so ’90s), and arbitrating a non-sexist solution to the need for a third person singular pronoun when gender is unknown (we prefer “they,” making the plural do double duty in the same way that we ask “you” to be of service as the singular and plural second person pronoun).
I just eat that stuff up!
Throughout the last decade of the 20th Century and the opening stanza of the 21st, I gradually accreted an increasing number of communication offerings onto my workshop menu. Today my offerings include Conflict, Facilitation, Power Dynamics, Consensus (which comes in two flavors), and Humor (think of it as spumoni).
Blogging a Dead Horse
Then, in 2007, I dipped my toe into the blogosphere. Seven years and 770 entries later, I’m still at it. While I encountered an existential hiccup a few years back—wondering if I’d run out of fresh ideas and fall prey to reheating leftovers—I’ve been able to put that particular devil behind me.
I’ve discovered that all I have to do is pay attention to what’s happening around me! Life is never dull for an itinerant community networker who is domiciled in a thriving ecovillage (note the clean spelling), and there is always a new foal or filly gamboling about in the landscape of my life, offering itself up as inspiration for my next blog (think of it as the virtual equivalent of My Friend Flicka). There’s really no reason to be anxious about slipping into a morbid fascination with describing dead horses.
Communities as a Pathway to Community
Even though publishing our quarterly magazine steadily loses money (we’ve finished in the black only twice in 22 years), it’s something that FIC holds dear and we’re doing everything in our power to keep it in print. The magazine was first launched in 1972, and has established itself as the source for information and inspiration about community living and cooperative culture.
We cover the Intentional Communities Movement in its full breadth: from cohousing to ecovillages; from ashrams to student co-ops; from group houses to agricultural communes.
At its best, Communities chronicles both the triumphs and the heartaches of cooperative living. We take you behind the scenes to examine what challenges people are encountering, and what solutions they are discovering in their day-to-day experiences of living together.
Cooperative living is messy business and we try to cover it all. We don’t sugar coat it, and we let authors disagree about the lessons to be learned. Our editorial mission is not to promulgate a party line; it’s to make the lines shorter for getting into the party. If there’s one thing we’ve learned from living in community, it’s that we’re all in this together and we’re only able to do our best work when we listen to everyone’s piece of the truth.
How You Can Help
This is where you come in. Nothing would make a more immediate impact on our bottom line than new subscribers. If you do not currently have a subscription, please consider clicking here and signing up. If you are a current subscriber, thank you!—and please consider giving a gift subscription to a friend or loved one.
The timing couldn’t be better! We’ve recently overhauled our website to offer content either as paper or plastic digital, and all back issues as either available as in-print copies or as digital downloads. We’re also offering a completely revised collection of the Best of Communities on 15 different themes, where we’ve gathered together 15-20 of the best articles we’ve published on a topic (including Good Meetings; Leadership, Power, and Membership; Elders in Community; Challenges and Lessons of Community; and Cohousing) and created dynamite packets of 55-65 pages each. Buy one or buy them all.
For the truly inspired, we offer a complete back issue set—all 161 of them—for the bargain price of $500.
For those especially moved by what Communities has meant to you and will continue to mean in our collective effort to manifest a more cooperative future, I invite you to consider making an earmarked tax-deductible donation in support of magazine operations. It all counts.
Your support today will help keep our cooperative flame burning brightly—and all of us cooperative authors in print (and off the street).

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