The Maypole at Mosaic Commons
Jubilee Cohousing
Nubanusit Cohousing
Prairie Hill Cohousing
Rocky Hill Cohousing
Trillium Hollow
Fresno Cohousing
Wolf Creek Lodge
Monterey Cohousing Minneapolis  MN
Hundredfold Farm Orrtanna PA
N St Cohousing Davis CA
Mosaic Commons Cohousing
Jamaica Plains Cohousing
Nevada City Coho baseball

Innovative. Sustainable. Home.

Cohousing communities are intentional, collaborative neighborhoods created with a little ingenuity. They bring together the value of private homes with the benefits of more sustainable living. That means residents actively participate in the design and operation of their neighborhoods, and share common facilities and good connections with neighbors. All in all, they stand as innovative and sustainable answers to today’s environmental and social problems. Welcome home.

The Future of Cohousing: The Next Generation

In 2014, my home community, Pioneer Valley Cohousing in Amherst Massachusetts, celebrated our 20th anniversary. A number of big changes here got me wondering - what comes next for my family, my community, and the national cohousing movement? When it came time to think about a theme for our conference, “the next generation” came to me immediately.

The first generation of cohousing has been a success! Research conducted by Coho/US in 2011 confirmed our anecdotal evidence that cohousing is good for children, parents, singles, seniors, the neighborhoods around them, and the environment. We proved the model works, though we stalled (along with the rest of the housing industry) during the recession. Groups are starting up again, but it is time to think about how to advance the movement within a new context. Demographics are changing rapidly with boomers reaching retirement and young adults less inclined or able to enter the home ownership market – all within an ominous backdrop of climate change and uncertainty.

Money in Community

With this entry I'm plowing new ground: for the first time, I'm posting an essay written by a guest author. In this case, Beth Raps, who lives in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia where she operates her business, Raising Clarity: to cultivate abundance in noble causes, people, and organizations.
I first met Beth last October in the context of FIC's search for a new Development Director, which she has been helping us think about more clearly.
As both of us have an abiding interest in sustainable economics, we've been in dialog about right relationship to money, and this essay is the fruit of that conversation. I hope you enjoy it half as much as Beth and I did crafting it.